Menu

News and Updates from our Team Members

Who Ya Gonna Call when Email Goes Wrong?
Email is one of those things that works great – until it doesn’t. With the average business owner or not-for-profit director intent on their own job, who should they ask to fix their email issues? ... Read Original Article
Re Evaluating Your Twitter Marketing Strategy
Heading into 2018 I’ve decided to take a fresh look at stale social media marketing practices. When we talk about valuable platforms for clients to use to market their businesses, Twitter is always ... Read Original Article
Re Evaluating Your Twitter Marketing Strategy
Heading into 2018 I’ve decided to take a fresh look at stale social media marketing practices. When we talk about valuable platforms for clients to use to market their businesses, Twitter is always ... Read Original Article
Your 2018 Digital Marketing Plan
Here’s a business resolution for the new year:  Be PRO-active instead of RE-active in your digital marketing. Your effort will be repaid many times over – and it’s not that tricky to implement. ... Read Original Article
Your 2018 Digital Marketing Plan
Here’s a business resolution for the new year:  Be PRO-active instead of RE-active in your digital marketing. Your effort will be repaid many times over – and it’s not that tricky to implement. ... Read Original Article
Clients ask me this question quite a bit.  The answer depends on many factors and it is different for each client depending upon the current market parameters and their unique circumstances. Right now, the California commercial real estate market for retail, office and industrial properties for sale and for lease in which I specialize in is pretty hot and has been for many years.  Prices for both sales and leasing have exceeded all-time highs historically in most California cities especially in Southern California where most of my transactions take place.  So, when prices are high it means that it’s not a good time to buy or lease, right?  Not necessarily.  And what if you have a business and have to do one or the other, which one do you choose? I define businesses that can occupy at least 51% of a building as “owner/users”.  Many times owner/users can pay more for a building because they can get a better loan than investors buying properties not occupying at least 51% of the building.  They also usually get better tax treatment when owning rather than leasing.  Owner/users have been buying quite a bit in the last couple of years.  They are buying even though prices are high, because of low interest rates and preferential tax treatment. The draw for these types of buyers is that it is better compared to leasing and, many times, that proves to be the case.  If they don’t occupy the entire building, but at least 51%, then they can lease out the rest of it which can also add to the positive bottom line. Whether you are an owner/user, or a business that can’t qualify as an owner/user, you have to compare the costs of leasing versus buying.  You have to take into consideration not only the loan and down payment costs, but also the tax implications.  This is where your unique circumstances come into play. Here are some common reasons why you shouldn’t or can’t buy.  In these situations, leasing is better:  If you don’t have enough money for a down payment, if you... Read Original Article
Top Marketing Trends of 2018
There has been a lot of buzz in the marketing world about what we can expect to see in the coming year. With the speed and direction of online marketing constantly increasing and changing, there are ... Read Original Article
Top Marketing Trends of 2018
There has been a lot of buzz in the marketing world about what we can expect to see in the coming year. With the speed and direction of online marketing constantly increasing and changing, there are ... Read Original Article
Top Marketing Trends of 2018
There has been a lot of buzz in the marketing world about what we can expect to see in the coming year. With the speed and direction of online marketing constantly increasing and changing, there are ... Read Original Article
Although the answer might seem obvious to some, this question is asked of me quite a bit in my role as a commercial real estate broker in California.  Generally in California for retail, office and industrial properties (and I am going to focus only on these since these are the ones I specialize in), the landlord or seller of a commercial property pays your broker a commission for your broker bringing you to the property. Many people believe that commissions are negotiable. This is true to some extent in theory and legally. In reality, about 99% of the time there is a market standard commission in the commercial real estate industry for a particular type of commercial property lease or sale that everyone agrees to. The total commission usually paid by a landlord or seller is 5-6% of the total rent over the lease term or the sale price.  This commission amount can vary.  This is especially true for more expensive properties for sale in excess of 10 million dollars. In those cases, the commission total is usually less and can instead be a set fee of say $200,000 as an example.  The landlord/selling broker enters into a contract with the landlord/seller for the entire commission, but then has to split that in some fashion with a tenant/buyer broker unless the landlord/seller broker also represents the buyer. (This latter scenario is called a dual representation and something I strongly recommend against ever doing as a tenant/buyer for many good reasons; more here on this subject.  In Southern California, the splits vary between the two brokers depending upon whether the deal was retail, office, industrial or other type of property. Let’s assume a 6% leasing and sales commission for our examples that follow.  Retail and industrial deals usually split the leasing/sales commission evenly (3% to each broker). Office deals usually pay 4% to the tenant’s leasing broker with the remaining 2% going to the landlord’s broker. But, for sales, the commission is split evenly.... Read Original Article
12345678910Last

Business Categories

Synergy Business Connections helps businesses grow through relationship marketing and we follow the exclusive category format with one member per Conejo Chamber of Commerce business sub-category. Your business sub-category appears on your Conejo Chamber profile page, right under your business name, to see if your category is eligible. We welcome you to join us at a meeting as our guest to experience the Synergy network for yourself.

Some messages from our group...

What makes the Conejo Valley special, unique or interesting?

I like to call Thousand Oaks "the biggest little town in the country." Even though its size is well over 100,000 residents, it still has a small town feel. You are liable to see someone you know every time you go out. I also like the fact that it has protected itself from the blight that has ruined so many other communities in Southern California by restricting things such as billboards, building structure and height, paid parking lots, and corner strip malls. 

— Cary Ginell - VC On Stage