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Attention Thousand Oaks Seniors: 2016 Regional Caregivers of the Year Exemplify A Higher Standard of Home Care A Higher Standard of Home Care for Thousand Oaks Seniors: 2016 Regional Caregivers of the Year Positive. Encouraging. Trustworthy. Compassionate. These are just some of the words BrightStar Care clients and families use to describe the outstanding Care Professionals they welcome into their homes and rely on for care and support for a loved one. These Caregivers, Certified Nursing Assistants, and Home Health Aides step into emotional and stressful situations and provide personalized, high-quality care no matter the circumstances – and the best of the best do so with unparalleled compassion, grace, and professionalism. Every year, we invite clients and families to share their stories of how a BrightStar Care Caregiver went above and beyond the call of duty to deliver A Higher Standard of Care and nominate them for our Caregiver of the Year award. Hundreds of nominations pour in from across the country filled with heartwarming and inspiring stories of how our Caregivers have made a lasting impact on the lives they have touched. They are the face – and heart – of our brand. We are honored to announce and celebrate our four Regional Caregivers of the Year for 2016. Read on for highlights of each regional winner and look for upcoming posts featuring each of these outstanding Caregivers individually, including the nomination letters that earned them this honor. Javier Lagunas – 2016 West Region Caregiver of the Year – BrightStar Care of Newport Beach/Irvine (CA) Javier’s nomination came from a mother of an adult son living with a traumatic brain injury that has caused cognitive as well as physical deficits requiring 24-hour care. She gratefully states, “Javier’s maturity, sense of humor, and work ethic have allowed him to expand [my son’s] world while he remains vigilant about protecting [his] well-being and safety.” Elsa Salguero – 2016 Midwest Region... Read Original Article
According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one out of every five falls results in a serious injury, such as a bone fracture or head injury.[1] We’re all susceptible to falls, but older adults in particular need to take special care. This is because as we age, mobility, strength, and sensory faculties can change. Help your parent or grandparent stay safe at home with the fall prevention tips below. You’ll be just in time for Fall Prevention Awareness Week, which coincides with the first week of fall (September 22-28). Lessen Risks Around the Home There’s no better place to start applying fall prevention tips than around the house. Reports show that more than 75% of accident-related injuries occur in the home. Take a look around your parent’s home, identify fall risks, and make changes to reduce them. Here are a few ideas to get you started: Clear pathways of electrical cords, furniture, and other clutter. Put regularly used items within easy reach, i.e. at waist or counter level. Put night lights in bathrooms and on stairs. Secure floor coverings with non-slip pads. Install hand rails, grab bars, and tub mats in the bathroom.[2] For even more ideas to fall-proof your home, read our blog post for National Safety Month. Make Self-Care a Priority Fall safety requires more than just minimizing external risks. Monitoring one’s health and practicing good self-care will help lessen physical vulnerabilities that can increase the chance of fall. Help your parent to do the following: Make regular appointments to check hearing and vision and wear comfortable hearing aids and eyeglasses with an adequate prescription. Properly take medications (for tips, read our Medication Management blog post). Exercise safely and moderately—mobilizing joints increases overall body function, lessening the risk of falls.[3] Eat a healthy, balanced diet and drink plenty of water, especially in the summer when seniors are at risk for heat-related illness. Ask for... Read Original Article
Fall Prevention Tips for Thousand Oaks Seniors Tips for Thousand Oaks Seniors on Fall Prevention According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one out of every five falls results in a serious injury, such as a bone fracture or head injury.[1] We’re all susceptible to falls, but older adults in particular need to take special care. This is because as we age, mobility, strength, and sensory faculties can change. Help your Thousand Oaks senior parent or grandparent stay safe at home with the fall prevention tips below. You’ll be just in time for Fall Prevention Awareness Week, which coincides with the first week of fall (September 22-28). Lessen Risks Around the Home There’s no better place to start applying fall prevention tips than around the house. Reports show that more than 75% of accident-related injuries occur in the home. Take a look around your Thousand Oaks senior parent’s home, identify fall risks, and make changes to reduce them. Here are a few ideas to get you started: Clear pathways of electrical cords, furniture, and other clutter. Put regularly used items within easy reach, i.e. at waist or counter level. Put night lights in bathrooms and on stairs. Secure floor coverings with non-slip pads. Install hand rails, grab bars, and tub mats in the bathroom.[2] For even more ideas to fall-proof your home, read our blog post for National Safety Month. Make Self-Care a Priority Fall safety requires more than just minimizing external risks. Monitoring one’s health and practicing good self-care will help lessen physical vulnerabilities that can increase the chance of fall. Help your parent to do the following: Make regular appointments to check hearing and vision and wear comfortable hearing aids and eyeglasses with an adequate prescription. Properly take medications (for tips, read our Medication Management blog post). Exercise safely and moderately—mobilizing joints increases overall body function, lessening the risk of... Read Original Article
Many people think of Labor Day as the unofficial end of summer, a last chance to relish barbecue and the outdoors. However, the origin of Labor Day goes back to 1885 when the day was first observed to honor the achievements of America’s workers.[1] So in addition to firing up the grill this holiday weekend, why not spend some time celebrating your parent’s or grandparent’s professional achievements? Whether he or she was a teacher, soldier, or homemaker, asking questions and creating a life story can provide a meaningful and memorable way to spend time together. Have a Conversation After making sure your parent or grandparent is open to it, set aside some time to sit together and ask about his or her career. There are a number of ways to do this. You might give a curious grandchild the assignment to act as a “reporter” for the day, coming up with questions to ask Grandma or Grandpa about education and work. Or, you might simply gather the family around for a casual conversation. Here are a few sample questions to get you started: How did you come to choose your career? What sort of education/training did you have to go through for your job? What was a typical day like at your job? Did you have any favorite friends at work? Did you have fun at work? What about the little things? How did you get to work? What did you eat for lunch? What was your workspace like? Did you make any big career changes? What was that like? Was it scary or exciting? How did your field/industry change over the years? Do you have any wisdom or advice for today’s workers? In order to make this a positive experience for all, make sure to tailor your questions and approach to be sensitive to your parent’s needs. For instance, a long list of in-depth questions won’t suit a senior with cognitive impairment. Further, some war veterans may shy away from discussing their experience in detail: monitor their reactions throughout the conversation and gently guide topics to suit. Create a Life... Read Original Article
Celebrate Your Thousand Oaks Senior Parent’s Career This Labor Day Take the Time this Labor Day to Celebrate Your Thousand Oaks senior Parent’s Career Many people think of Labor Day as the unofficial end of summer, a last chance to relish barbecue and the outdoors. However, the origin of Labor Day goes back to 1885 when the day was first observed to honor the achievements of America’s workers.[1] So in addition to firing up the grill this holiday weekend, why not spend some time celebrating your Thousand Oaks senior parent’s or grandparent’s professional achievements? Whether he or she was a teacher, soldier, or homemaker, asking questions and creating a life story can provide a meaningful and memorable way to spend time together. Have a Conversation After making sure your Thousand Oaks senior parent or grandparent is open to it, set aside some time to sit together and ask about his or her career. There are a number of ways to do this. You might give a curious grandchild the assignment to act as a “reporter” for the day, coming up with questions to ask Grandma or Grandpa about education and work. Or, you might simply gather the family around for a casual conversation. Here are a few sample questions to get you started: How did you come to choose your career? What sort of education/training did you have to go through for your job? What was a typical day like at your job? Did you have any favorite friends at work? Did you have fun at work? What about the little things? How did you get to work? What did you eat for lunch? What was your workspace like? Did you make any big career changes? What was that like? Was it scary or exciting? How did your field/industry change over the years? Do you have any wisdom or advice for today’s workers? In order to make this a positive experience for all, make sure to tailor your questions and approach to be sensitive to your parent’s needs. For instance, a long list of in-depth questions won’t suit a senior with cognitive... Read Original Article

Ventura County Home Care Association (VCHA) Membership Drive @ The Stonehaus

Please RSVP to Gaby via text 805-795-0249 or gabyf@losrobleshomecare.com

VCHA Members Welcome!

*         Invite Homecare Professionals in the community to join our VCHA open house and join our association.
*         VCHA welcomes healthcare businesses that service the Ventura County area.
*         Board and Cares, Skilled Nursing Facilities, Caregiving, Home Health, etc.

For more information or to apply, click HERE

VCHA-Membership-Drive-Sept

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If you help care for your aging parent, then you’ve probably heard the importance of taking preventative measures against pneumonia. That’s because seniors are much more prone to catching the illness. In fact, according to a 2009 study, the annual incidence of pneumonia among adults over 65 is four times that of younger populations.[1] Read our FAQs to learn why and get tips to identify pneumonia symptoms and ensure a speedy recovery for your parent. What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection (viral, bacterial, or fungal) of the lungs. Cases can range in severity. Milder cases sometimes get referred to as “walking” pneumonia because the infected person doesn’t have to stay in bed.[2] More severe cases require bedrest. Why are older adults more susceptible to pneumonia? A few factors make seniors more susceptible than younger people: Weakened Immune System While symptoms like chills, shortness of breath, and chest pain will stand out to younger individuals, they may register as fairly typical among seniors, given their already weakened immune response. As a result, a senior may not even notice the signs of pneumonia, and thus may not seek help.[3] Smaller Lung Capacity As we age, our lung capacity shrinks. This makes it harder to cough up sputum, the mucus our lungs secrete in order to clear infections. By consequence, infections can fester among older adults and, worse, the mucus may accumulate in the bronchial tubes, preventing oxygen from entering the blood and cells of the body.[4] Community-Acquired Pneumonia Residing in an assisted living community or nursing home puts your parent at greater risk of contracting pneumonia due to the close proximity of potentially infected residents, visitors, and workers. This is known as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Dementia and Alzheimer’s Older adults with dementia may not communicate that they’re not feeling well, thus allowing an infection to go unnoticed and worsen. Why is pneumonia a more serious condition... Read Original Article
Risk and Signs for Thousand Oaks Seniors Regarding Elderly Pneumonia Elderly Pneumonia: FAQ for Thousand Oaks Seniors If you help care for your aging Thousand Oaks senior parent, then you’ve probably heard the importance of taking preventative measures against pneumonia. That’s because seniors are much more prone to catching the illness. In fact, according to a 2009 study, the annual incidence of pneumonia among adults over 65 is four times that of younger populations.[1] Read our FAQs to learn why and get tips to identify pneumonia symptoms and ensure a speedy recovery for your parent. What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection (viral, bacterial, or fungal) of the lungs. Cases can range in severity. Milder cases sometimes get referred to as “walking” pneumonia because the infected person doesn’t have to stay in bed.[2] More severe cases require bedrest. Why are older adults more susceptible to pneumonia? A few factors make Thousand Oaks seniors more susceptible than younger people: Weakened Immune System While symptoms like chills, shortness of breath, and chest pain will stand out to younger individuals, they may register as fairly typical among seniors, given their already weakened immune response. As a result, a senior may not even notice the signs of pneumonia, and thus may not seek help.[3] Smaller Lung Capacity As we age, our lung capacity shrinks. This makes it harder to cough up sputum, the mucus our lungs secrete in order to clear infections. By consequence, infections can fester among older adults and, worse, the mucus may accumulate in the bronchial tubes, preventing oxygen from entering the blood and cells of the body.[4] Community-Acquired Pneumonia Residing in an assisted living community or nursing home puts your parent at greater risk of contracting pneumonia due to the close proximity of potentially infected residents, visitors, and workers. This is known as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Dementia and Alzheimer’s Older adults with... Read Original Article
A picnic can be a fun summer activity the whole family can enjoy together, but there are some special considerations to keep in mind when elderly family members will be part of your get together. Luckily, planning a picnic right in your own backyard can simplify things without compromising the fun. Read on for easy picnic ideas that will create lasting memories for Grandma, Grandpa, your children, and you. Prepare for the Elements The beauty of hosting a picnic in your backyard is that you can control a variety of factors. Choose a shaded spot on even terrain to protect your parent from overheating or falling. You’ll also want easy access to the backdoor for bathroom trips and in the event the weather suddenly turns. Of course, if your parent has a condition that makes picnicking outside too difficult, you can always plan a picnic indoors, or simply take them for a picturesque car ride. Select the Right Seating In addition to looking for a spot with even terrain, you’ll also want to think about what sort of seating will provide most comfort to your parent. In most cases, a table is preferable to eating on the ground as getting up and down can pose a challenge to seniors with limited mobility. A camping or card table is easy to transport in and out of doors and hits at a good height for seniors in wheelchairs. We recommend chairs with backs over benches. Plan the Menu When cooking food for your picnic, remember that the focus of the day is on spending quality time together—you, your parent, your kids, and other extended family. Choose simple, healthy foods; you don’t need to plan a gourmet meal. If your parent has difficulty chewing, take corn off the cob and meat off the bone, but do this in the kitchen rather than out in front of guests, which might embarrass your parent. Chunks of watermelon make a sweet treat to cap the meal. Finally, keep water glasses full as seniors are more vulnerable to heat stroke and exhaustion. Organize Fun and Games Soft background... Read Original Article
Thousand Oaks Seniors: Here are Backyard Picnic Tips for you and the Whole Family Tips for Thousand Oaks Seniors in Regards to Backyard Picnics A picnic can be a fun summer activity the whole family can enjoy together, but there are some special considerations to keep in mind when elderly family members will be part of your get together. Luckily, planning a picnic right in your own backyard can simplify things without compromising the fun. Read on for easy picnic ideas that will create lasting memories for Grandma, Grandpa, your children, and you. Prepare for the Elements The beauty of hosting a picnic in your backyard is that you can control a variety of factors. Choose a shaded spot on even terrain to protect your parent from overheating or falling. You’ll also want easy access to the backdoor for bathroom trips and in the event the weather suddenly turns. Of course, if your parent has a condition that makes picnicking outside too difficult, you can always plan a picnic indoors, or simply take them for a picturesque car ride. Select the Right Seating In addition to looking for a spot with even terrain, you’ll also want to think about what sort of seating will provide most comfort to your parent. In most cases, a table is preferable to eating on the ground as getting up and down can pose a challenge to seniors with limited mobility. A camping or card table is easy to transport in and out of doors and hits at a good height for seniors in wheelchairs. We recommend chairs with backs over benches. Plan the Menu When cooking food for your picnic, remember that the focus of the day is on spending quality time together—you, your parent, your kids, and other extended family. Choose simple, healthy foods; you don’t need to plan a gourmet meal. If your parent has difficulty chewing, take corn off the cob and meat off the bone, but do this in the kitchen rather than out in front of guests, which might embarrass your parent. Chunks of watermelon make a sweet treat to cap... Read Original Article
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Synergy Business Connections helps businesses grow through relationship marketing and we follow the exclusive category format with one member per Conejo Chamber of Commerce business sub-category. Your business sub-category appears on your Conejo Chamber profile page, right under your business name, to see if your category is eligible. We welcome you to join us at a meeting as our guest to experience the Synergy network for yourself.

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What makes the Conejo Valley special, unique or interesting?

I like to call Thousand Oaks "the biggest little town in the country." Even though its size is well over 100,000 residents, it still has a small town feel. You are liable to see someone you know every time you go out. I also like the fact that it has protected itself from the blight that has ruined so many other communities in Southern California by restricting things such as billboards, building structure and height, paid parking lots, and corner strip malls. 

— Cary Ginell - VC On Stage

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